Archive for March 2013

Repackaged CryptoRF/LibNFC Example Code

March 30, 2013

Earlier, I tried to build the “NFC-CryptoRF” example code from the LibNFC Wiki, without success against LibNFC 1.7.0-rc4-9-g3584338, under Ubuntu 12.10.

Unsurprisingly, thanks to the LibNFC developers constantly changing their public APIs (for good reasons, I’m sure), said example code has succumbed to bit-rot, and only builds against obsolete versions of LibNFC.

Therefore, it seems that the only immediately obvious way for this code to be useful is to either downgrade the installed library version, or attempt to fix the hacky code to compensate for changes.

Luckily, after temporarily uninstalling my trunk version; downloading, and installing a LibNFC 1.3.4 source archive, applying the patch from a member of the LibNFC Forums to the example code, and attempting to rebuild everything, it seems that the example code works as it should.

After reinstating my modern LibNFC version; configuring 1.3.4’s build process to install to a temporary directory, copying the resulting ancient shared object file to “libnfc.so.0” in the example code directory, and creating a wrapper shell (“crf134“) script based upon the arguments passing technique mentioned here, it seems that I can now enjoy being able to use this tool, alongside more modern, “global” versions of LibNFC…

Anyway, to save others the hassle, I’ve uploaded the resulting product to Google Code.

As proof of peaceful co-existence with a more modern version of LibNFC:

Finally, in order to satisfy the terms of the (L)GPL, I have also included the original, uncompressed LibNFC 1.3.4 archive, the patched example source code, a copy of the patch, and the unpacked LibNFC directory containing both source, and 32-bit Linux binaries.

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Finally, CryptoRF

March 29, 2013

Yesterday, I finally received a package from Atmel USA containing some sample ISO/IEC14443 Type-B CryptoRF tags, after numerous failed attempts at requesting some via their sample request form.

I ordered 1 sample of the 8KB AT88SC0808CRF-MX1 variant, and 2 samples of the 4KB AT88RF04C-MX1G variant.

The 4KB tags seem to be unusually packaged, and I don’t know if it’d be safe to carefully attempt to cut the strip in half using scissors, in order to make it easier to work with each:

I was probably expecting to receive paper-mounted tags, similar to my FeliCa Lite, and MiFare UltraLight ones – but the product seems to work as advertised.

Curiously, I was able to trigger an unusual hardware glitch in the PN532 chipset, if I carefully placed the strip of 4KB tags in the reader’s field in a specific way, which manifested in the following output from nfc-list -v:

I’ve also uploaded a USB trace file demonstrating this phenomenon, here.

It seems that I’m supposed to see this, instead:

Unsurprisingly, I can’t seem to be able to reliably read either of these two, without even more careful positioning – which suggests anti-collision problems (probably since both have the same unique ID, as supplied)…

The 8KB version, and its accompanying protective packaging looks like:

(Hand not included!)

…and nfc-list -v says:

When I get time, I intend to study the datasheet, and probably play with building TAMA shell scripts, with a view to trying to write another command set dissector.

That said, I have, however tried to compile the sample code on the LibNFC wiki, without success.

Maybe someone else has succeeded in building it against the latest revisions of LibNFC?

Minor Wireshark NFC/RFID Dissector Updates

March 6, 2013

Recently, I updated my FeliCa, and NXP PN532 Wireshark dissectors to support the following functionality:

PN532 dissector:

  • Support for dissection of MiFare command payloads in PN532 InDataExchange packets (bug #8291)
    • This means that command packets (but not responses) from tools such as MFOC, and the tools from LibNFC for accessing MiFare Classic, and MiFare UltraLight tokens are dissected.
  • Support for dissection of FeliCa payloads in PN532 InCommunicateThru packets (bug #8246)
    • This means that dissection of packets from almost all of an “NFC Tag Type 3” (barring NDEF payload data) tag reading session should be dissected, using the FeliCa “flavour” of notation.

FeliCa dissector:

  • Support for the FeliCa Plug system code (bug #7767)
    • This theoretically means that Sony’s new FeliCa Plug should be identified in “Polling Response” packets.
  • Update to identify commands from the full FeliCa Standard profile (bug #8243)
    • This theoretically means that commands related to enciphered reading/writing, authentication, searching for system/service codes, and requesting system information from the latest FeliCa Standard tokens should be at least identified.

I have also been trying to update Google’s dissectors to work with the latest SVN revisions of Wireshark, with mixed success. However, it seems that project has temporarily stalled – save for some brief exchanges on its mailing list, that didn’t really go anywhere.

Anyway, I remain willing to assist with that effort; and in the interim, I hope that this new functionality is useful.